10-Point Action Plan Aims To Improve Recycling Across England

Keep Britain Tidy has produced a 10-piont action plan to improve urban recycling rate in England as a part of the publication of its latest report, The Ur[Bin] Issue.

The Ur[Bin] Issue report, Commissioned and sponsored by SITA UK, presents the results of a public inquiry, conducted by Keep Britain Tidy, which sought to find new ways to improve recycling rates in urban environments across England – by involving members of the public in deliberative research.

Phil Barton, Keep Britain Tidy – “Working together with householders in this way has given us a deeper understanding of the realities of recycling for urban communities and it forms the basis of our recommendations”

Three clear over-arching elements emerged from members of the public, which were then tested by Keep Britain Tidy in an online poll of 1,000 people living across the country, to determine whether or not they were widely supported.

The elements needed for improvement were found to be:

  • Engagement (providing good quality, accessible, information to empower people and change attitudes)
  • Motivation (to reinforce positive behaviours);
  • Infrastructure to support those attitudes and behaviours.

From this, Keep Britain Tidy has produced a 10-point action plan to improve urban recycling performance across England.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge

The 10 action points are aimed at a range of stakeholders in the recycling process and will require the buy-in of government at all levels, the recycling industry, manufacturers, retailers, and householders. It cannot be achieved by any one sector in isolation.

Director of External Affairs for SITA UK, Dr Gev Eduljee, said: “The clear, concise, recommendations made by Keep Britain Tidy in this report have stemmed directly from householders. SITA UK fully supports them.

“From listening to our ‘jurors’ at the events, it is evident that much work remains to be done to help people living in urban environments to engage with recycling. We saw from the citizens’ juries that once householders are engaged, this empowers them to make their own positive choices and adjust their behaviours accordingly.

Chief Executive of Keep Britain Tidy, Phil Barton commented: “Working together with householders in this way has given us a deeper understanding of the realities of recycling for urban communities and it forms the basis of our recommendations. We believe that working with residents to co-design solutions and services is the best approach.

“It is clear that there is much work to do in order to enable England to meet and surpass recycling targets and that central to this is a need to engage householders and communities more deeply in understanding how recycling works, why it is important and the value of our finite resources.

We welcome discussion from the wider sector about the recommendations in this report and how we can work together to develop informed and enabled communities, actively recycling across England.”

Read our report, The Ur(bin) Issue, here.


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