Glass Processing Plant Is Step Forward For Scottish Circular Economy

22-11-13(3)picA £5m glass recycling plant has been opened by Environment Secretary Richard Lochhead that could turn a quarter of Scotland’s recycled glass into a high-value water filtration medium.

The Dryden Aqua facility in Bonnyrigg, Midlothian uses recycled green glass (cullet) to create a new product that can be adapted to target specific water-borne parasites and pollutants, with markets here and overseas.

Zero Waste Scotland is working with Dryden Aqua to increase the supply of cullet from within Scotland. At present the company imports its recycled glass, while around a quarter of glass collected for recycling in Scotland is turned into low value products such as aggregate materials.

Iain Gulland, director of Zero Waste Scotland, said: “By turning a waste material into a high-value product, Dryden Aqua exemplifies the innovation and systems thinking we need more of if we are to achieve our vision for a circular economy in Scotland. This new plant is a great step forward and we believe that it can open up a long-term recycling market for green glass in Scotland, complementing the demand for clear cullet in bottling for the whisky industry.”

Iain Gulland, Zero Waste Scotland – “This new plant is a great step forward and we believe that it can open up a long-term recycling market for green glass in Scotland, complementing the demand for clear cullet in bottling for the whisky industry”

It can be used to filter drinking water, treat industrial waste water and in swimming pool filtration with the potential to generate significant savings for the water industry.

The plant fits in with Scotland’s vision of moving towards a circular economy where products are designed to be re-used and recycled rather than being disposed of as waste once we have finished with them.

Mr Lochhead said: “This is a revolutionary system from Dryden Aqua which exemplifies the technological and environmental expertise that Scotland is famous for. It is also a major investment in Scotland’s green credentials and places us at the forefront of the move towards a zero waste nation.

“This is a great example of upcycling where we create something of higher value than the original substance. This technology can be used in developing countries to ensure cleaner, healthier water for all, showcasing the global reach and importance of Scottish innovation, which is a key element of the Hydro Nation agenda.

“This move to a circular economy will grow our green economy and open the potential for an estimated 5,000 new jobs to turn the things we recycle back into valuable materials for manufacturing.”

 

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