Anglesey Considers Three Weekly Waste Collections

Anglesey’s executive will be asked to approve three weekly collections of its residual waste from October 2016 onwards.

A report to go before the committee on Monday (January 25), will recommend the move in a bid to meet recycling targets, avoid heavy fines and improve the environment.

Like all councils, Anglesey has been set ambitious recycling targets by Welsh Government. By 2019/20, it must recycle 64% of its municipal waste and 70% by 2024/25. Failure to meet these statutory targets would mean huge fines, which could easily run into hundreds of thousands of pounds every year.

Collecting and processing recycling material is more than £40 per tonne cheaper than the cost of collecting and disposing/treating a tonne of black bin waste. Changing the current collection systems would encourage households on Anglesey to recycle more as well as reduce the cost of dealing with residual waste, the council says.

Head of highways, waste and property, Dewi Williams – “The fundamental principle of this report is that collecting and processing recycling materials is far cheaper than collecting and disposing of ‘black bin’ residual waste. Our main aim is, therefore, to reduce the level of residual waste and increase recycling levels”

Head of highways, waste and property, Dewi Williams, explained: “We face major challenges in meeting future statutory recycling targets set by the Welsh Government, combined with a need to operate services more efficiently due to budget cuts.”

“The fundamental principle of this report is that collecting and processing recycling materials is far cheaper than collecting and disposing of ‘black bin’ residual waste. Our main aim is, therefore, to reduce the level of residual waste and increase recycling levels.”

He added: “Whilst the financial savings from implementing three weekly collections would be minimal, the move should help the County Council reach a recycling rate of around 68% and – if recycling can be improved beyond this figure – we’d hope that four weekly collections could be avoided in the future.”

If changes to the collection service are introduced in October 2016, households would still receive a weekly collection of dry recycling (red and blue boxes) and food waste (brown bin) and a fortnightly collection of green garden waste (green bin).

The County Council would also provide an extra 55-litre box for recycling mixed plastics eg, butter tubs and yogurt pots (an extra service that isn’t currently offered). With these items being recycled, less material would go into the black bin and that it won’t need to be collected as often.

Highways, waste and property portfolio holder, Councillor John Arwel Roberts, added: “Over 75% of the waste we produce in the home is recyclable. However, recent research has shown that very high levels of recyclable material are still being thrown into the black bin on Anglesey. This means many people aren’t fully using the recycling services available. Reducing ‘black bin’ collections will encourage householders to make the most of their recycling collection service.”

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