Assessment Shows Edinburgh Streets Are Getting Cleaner

28-08-13(6)picThe streets of Edinburgh are getting cleaner, with fewer incidences of dog fouling and graffiti, according to the latest assessment by Keep Scotland Beautiful.

A total of 95 percent of streets assessed as part of the Cleanliness Index Monitoring (CIMS) scheme in June this year were found to have acceptable levels of litter. This is an increase from 89 percent in December 2012.

Data collated from the assessments have shown an upward trend in performance since 2009 to 2010.

Steve Lee – “The quality of our local environment contributes directly to the sense of wellbeing and civic pride and plays an important role in improving the economic prosperity of our towns, cities, boroughs and rural districts”

A CIMS assessment is carried out for the City of Edinburgh Council four times a year, with grades and points given according to the amount of litter found on a selection of streets.

Five out of six neighbourhoods received a cleanliness index result of 67 or above, achieving the national standard target. Eleven out of 17 wards met or exceeded the Council target of 72, while five wards achieved a result of 100 percent clean, compared to only two wards in March this year.

Inspectors reported that the biggest source of litter was from pedestrians (91 percent of all litter identified in the survey) but that there was a reduction in the incidence of dog fouling, down from eight percent to four percent.

Councillor Lesley Hinds, transport and environment convener, said: “These are fantastic results, and I would like to say a big thank you to all our street cleaning and environmental warden staff who have worked so hard to keep Edinburgh a clean and beautiful city. I would also like to thank residents who play their part by disposing of litter responsibly and taking part in community clean ups.

“However we still have some way to go to in terms of public behaviour when pedestrians are responsible for 91 percent of litter on the streets of Edinburgh. I urge people to use bins and recycling points, or else to take rubbish home to dispose of rather than throwing it onto the ground.”

CIWM chief executive, Steve Lee, said: “The quality of our local environment contributes directly to the sense of wellbeing and civic pride and plays an important role in improving the economic prosperity of our towns, cities, boroughs and rural districts. Our communities deserve well maintained and attractive public places and the [CIWM] Clean Britain Awards recognise and reward the efforts made by councils and other organisations to keep our local areas clean and welcoming.”

For more on CIWM’s Clean Britain Awards CLICK HERE

 

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