Councillors Approve Wales’ First Three-Weekly Collection

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Gwynedd County Council has become the first in Wales to approve a three-weekly collection for its “black bag” waste. 

The council has moved from fortnightly collections of its “black bag” waste to a three-weekly collection, after Gwynedd County Council unanimously approved the decision yesterday (29 April).

It is hoped the scheme, which will come into force in October, will reduce waste sent to landfill and increase recycling. The council also claimed that the move will lead to savings of £350,000.

The council says it will take 18 months to introduce throughout the entire county.

There will be no changes to frequency of weekly household recycling and food waste services, and a fortnightly collection of garden waste.

Although the council hopes the move will reduce waste, surveys revealed that residents were concerned about the disposal of nappies, and in response a fortnightly collection, together with clinical waste, will be brought in to resolve this.

Councillor Gareth Roberts – “We must now take steps to persuade those residents who continue to throw waste that can be recycled or composted into their residential waste bins to start using the convenient weekly recycling and food waste services”

Other concerns by critics include the issue of rats, smells and containers becoming too heavy. The council, however, has said that the scheme will work, particularly if people recycle food waste.

Councillor Gareth Roberts said: “We must now take steps to persuade those residents who continue to throw waste that can be recycled or composted into their residential waste bins to start using the convenient weekly recycling and food waste services.”

Councillor Louise Hughes, criticised the move as “ridiculous”.

She said: “They did a questionnaire and had almost 2,000 responses and most people said ‘no way’. I can’t believe they’re going to go ahead, it will be a complete, unmitigated disaster.

“What it will mean especially for coastal towns is seagulls will be ripping open bin-bags. What is the point of consultation and then saying ‘we’re going to do it anyway’?”

The move to a less frequent collection of “black bag” waste comes as Welsh councils must recycle or compost a minimum of 52 percent of all refuse, which will increase to 58 percent in 2015/16.

At the beginning of the month (7 April), Swansea implemented a three black bin bags for collection every fortnight in an attempt by the local authority to increase recycling and reduce the amount of refuse being sent to landfill.

 

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