Councils Cut Residents’ Food Waste Collections

Lichfield District Council and Tamworth Borough Council have asked their residents to stop disposing of their food waste with their composting and to instead dispose of it with their “black bin” refuse collections. 

The councils have said that the cost of composting residents’ food waste with their garden waste is “an expensive process”.

Lichfield District Council and Tamworth Borough Council share a waste collection service and to remind residents to not recycle their food waste have unveiled “giant advertisements” on the side of their waste and recycling trucks.

The cut is expected to save the authorities a total of £400,000 per year.

Councillor Iain Eadie, Lichfield District Council – “food waste could now contaminate the garden waste we compost, so it’s really important that everyone remembers to add it to their black bins from now on”

“If you don’t put food waste in with your brown bin, we can send your remaining garden waste to an outdoor composting facility, which is much cheaper,” the council’s told residents.

“Because about only 20 percent of local people put food waste in their brown bins at the moment – lots of people compost in their gardens – we are spending money composting garden waste at a controlled temperature, which isn’t cost effective.

“This is why we will be asking you to put your food waste in your black bin from now on. Doing so will make our service more efficient and help to protect other local services across Lichfield and Tamworth.”

Councillor Iain Eadie, Lichfield District Council’s Cabinet Member for IT & Waste Management, explains: “We hope plenty of people will see the travelling advertisements and other promotional material we’ve created, because food waste could now contaminate the garden waste we compost, so it’s really important that everyone remembers to add it to their black bins from now on.”

The councils’ residual waste is sent for energy recovery and is collected fortnightly. It is then processed at Staffordshire’s 300,000 tonnes per year capacity energy-from-waste plant, which was developed developed under a 25-year, £1bn PFI-funded waste treatment contract between the Staffordshire Waste Partnership and Veolia Environmental Services.


 

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