Energy Recovery Project To Replace EfW Plant In North London

North London Waste Authority (NLWA) has today (20 November 2014) announced the start of the North London Heat and Power Project – a £450-500m energy recovery facility at the Edmonton EcoPark in the London Borough of Enfield.

This would replace the existing energy from waste plant at the EcoPark that has served north London well for around 45 years but is coming to the end of its operational life.

NLWA and the seven boroughs in the area have agreed a joint target for north London to aim for at least 50 percent of its waste to be recycled by 2020.

Using fuel – waste collected by the seven boroughs, which cannot be recycled ­– the replacement facility would generate power for around 127,000 homes and could provide heat for local homes and businesses. Heat would be distributed locally through schemes like Enfield Council’s planned Lee Valley Heat Network.

Councillor Clyde Loakes, Chair of NLWA, said: “We want to prevent waste, we want you to recycle it and anything you can’t, we’re going to turn into fuel and use it to heat and power homes.

Councillor Clyde Loakes, Chair of NLWA – “We want the best technology available when it comes to air quality, the best design available in terms of how it looks, and best of all, in my opinion, is we’re going to be able to heat people’s homes for many years to come”

“We’re already doing it and this way we can continue to do it, which is good news for jobs, investment and sorting out north London’s waste problem.

“We are going to set the benchmark with this project: We want the best technology available when it comes to air quality, the best design available in terms of how it looks, and best of all, in my opinion, is we’re going to be able to heat people’s homes for many years to come.

“This is planning ahead. This replacement facility will still be heating homes when young Prince George is in his 40s.”

The new facility will set a benchmark for similar projects in the UK and across Europe when controlling emissions, being capable of achieving levels of 60 percent below the current permissible limits. This will make the replacement amongst the best, if not the best, in the UK and Europe.

The existing facility employs around 180 people and a replacement would ensure there are manual and highly-skilled jobs on the site for many decades to come.

There will also be many construction jobs involved in building the new plant – expected to start around 2022 and last for three years – as well as jobs involved in the demolition of the existing energy from waste plant.

The scheme ensures the EcoPark will continue to be a hub for energy and renewable heat expertise. It would provide significant investment in the local Edmonton area and provide opportunities for local business to supply services.

Councillor Clyde Loakes added: “This is a very prescriptive planning process set out by the Government for projects like these. We will use this process to ensure we get the best project for north London.”


 

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