ESA Calls For Collaboration To Address Recycling Difficulties

The Environmental Services Association (ESA) has called for increased collaboration to address recycling difficulties, following the closure of Aylesford Newsprint. 

Speaking at the Kent Resource Partnership Annual Conference in Canterbury, ESA’s executive director, Jacob Hayler, said: “Aylesford Newsprint’s sad closure has focused minds on the current turbulence In the UK’s recycling industry.

“We have seen multiple bankruptcies and the state of the market remains extremely challenging. We need all of the supply chain – including local authorities, reprocessors, and the waste companies which serve them both – to work together to ensure a sustainable recycling sector for the future.”

Hayler also called for the government and the regulator to maintain momentum in the fight against waste crime.

“The industry has lobbied intensively for waste crime to be addressed. It is important that Defra and the Environment Agency keep up the good work and make sure that we see implementation on the ground,” he said.

Jacob Hayler, ESA – “We have seen multiple bankruptcies and the state of the market remains extremely challenging. We need all of the supply chain – including local authorities, reprocessors, and the waste companies which serve them both – to work together to ensure a sustainable recycling sector for the future”

More than 230 jobs were lost after a Kent-based recycled newsprint paper manufacturer went into administration at the end of February.

The company blamed “challenging operating conditions”, including overcapacity in the newsprint market, coupled with the rise of digital media.

Aylesford Newsprint Limited produced around 400,000 tonnes of recycled newsprint from 500,000 tonnes of recycled waste fibre annually.

It supplied newsprint to some of the main newspaper groups, employed nearly 300 people and recorded a turnover of £139m in 2013.

The business employed nearly 300 staff and recorded a turnover of £139m in 2013, supplied its newsprint to some of the main newspaper groups.

Upon appointment of the administrators, the production facility was closed and 233 employees were made redundant.

The remaining 65 staff have been retained to assist the administrators in the sale of the assets and the decommissioning of the plant.

The Kent Resource Partnership (KRP) Members Board has said it is very concerned a national trend may be developing, where recycling businesses are facing such intense pressures that they either diminish operations or cease to continue. (See CIWM Journal Online story)


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