EU Environment Committee Presses For 70% Recycling Rate

european-parliamentThe European Parliament’s Environment Committee has proposed amendments to the Waste Framework Directive and has called for a 70% municipal recycling target.

The Committee wants stronger requirements for the separate collection of recyclables, through EU Circular Economy laws, on top of those put forward by the European Commission in its Circular Economy Package.

Its call for a 70% municipal recycling target by 2030 is up 5% compared to the 65% proposed in the Package published last year.

Resource Association – “This amendment clearly marks out a desire to see the reporting of discarded waste as recycled waste prevented and states clearly the desire to settle on point of input to final recycling process as the correct point of measurement. We warmly welcome this”

The proposals were led by Rapporteur Simona Bonafè MEP and also set out a 65% target for organic waste recycling by 2025, and a ban on the incineration of separately collected waste.

The Committee has also proposed a final target of 70% by 2025 and 80% by 2030 for packaging recycling, an increase of 5%, and has also called for a target of 25% by 2025 for the reduction of landfill.

MEPs will now consider whether to adopt the proposals.

The Resource Association has welcomed the ambition indicated by many proposed amendments to the Commission’s initial proposals as a necessary and important contribution to the debate.

Chief Executive Ray Georgeson said: “I am pleased to see a clear position from the European Parliament Environment Committee in relation to the harmonisation of recycling rate calculation methodology as described in their Amendment 21.

“This amendment clearly marks out a desire to see the reporting of discarded waste as recycled waste prevented and states clearly the desire to settle on point of input to final recycling process as the correct point of measurement. We warmly welcome this.”

“In addition, it will be interesting to see the emerging debate about Amendment 109 that proposes the removal of the TEEP restrictions in the existing Article 11 provisions. The justification statement from the Committee is telling: ‘The introduction of technical, environmental and financial limits has allowed numerous exemptions, rendering application of this principle impossible’.

We concur with this view and look forward to the next level of debate about this important element in the delivery of the circular economy – the best ways to provide consistent high quality materials to manufacturers and reprocessors, especially in the context of the move in England to encourage local authorities towards greater consistency in household recycling collections.”

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