Is The UK Opposing Circular Economy Package Recycling Targets?

SONY DSCThe UK may be opposing tough new waste and recycling targets set out in the forthcoming circular economy package 2.0, according to a leaked paper.

The paper, seen by both Business Green and the Guardian suggests that the UK is against setting new waste and recycling targets.

The recycling targets for member states are expected to be set at least as high as 70% by 2020, which was laid out in the former package scrapped earlier this year.

A paper on the UK’s position argues that any new targets should be put on hold, according to the Guardian.

The leaked paper reportedly states that the UK is in favour of voluntary acts and incentives, over strict targets.

“We feel that a greater emphasis needs to be given to other measures such as voluntary agreements with industry and incentives to reward behavioural changes”

It says: “We feel that a greater emphasis needs to be given to other measures such as voluntary agreements with industry and incentives to reward behavioural changes.”

MEPs will vote on a call for binding waste, food waste and resource efficiency targets at a plenary session in Strasbourg today (9 July).

Karmenu Vella, told the Guardian last week that beefed-up green objectives would be essential to the circular economy package’s success.

Earlier this week MEPs urged for the European Parliament to support a draft report that sets out “ambitious” circular economy proposals ahead of the MEP plenary vote.

Among the recommendations in the draft report is a ban on landfilling recyclable and biodegradable waste by 2025 and increasing municipal recycling targets to at least 70%.

The report also calls for incineration to be limited to non-recyclable and non-biodegradable waste by 2020, and calls for incentives for the uptake of reused or recycled materials and extended producer responsibility requirements at a European level.

First Vice-President Frans Timmermans said in the European Parliament plenary debate earlier this week: “The future of the European economy is in the circular economy, in reusing, in putting things back into the economic cycle, in thinking in terms of cradle to cradle. And funnily enough, businesses have got it better and more clearly than us as politicians.”

A recent report by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation revealed that by adopting circular economy principles, Europe can take advantage of the impending “technology revolution” to create a net benefit of €1.8tr by 2030, or €0.9tr more than in the current linear development path.


Send this to a friend