Keep Britain Tidy And SITA Launch Inquiry To Boost Urban Recycling Rates

21-01-14(4)picIn partnership with SITA UK, Keep Britain Tidy (KBT) has launched a national initiative to find new ways of improving recycling rates in England’s major cities.

Recycling in England is flatlining and, while some areas of the country are reaching recycling rates nearing 70 percent, other areas are only achieving 15 percent.

Among those authorities with the lowest recycling rates, many include densely populated urban environments, which pose a significant challenge to effective recycling.

England is also facing the danger that it won’t achieve its EU 2020 recycling target of 50 percent but, despite this, the current government has withdrawn funding and focus from sustainable resource use – placing its future in the hands of the waste management industry.

Andy Walker, KBT – “Tackling waste is something in which the public has a big role to play but all too often debates about recycling do not include ordinary people. These juries are an opportunity for the man, or woman, on the street to have their say on an important issue that affects us all”

SITA UK has commissioned Keep Britain Tidy to conduct a comprehensive inquiry, which seeks to design detailed solutions to improve recycling rates in urban environments, by involving members of the public working alongside waste industry experts.

In order to do this, Keep Britain Tidy and consultation specialists, Britain Thinks, will host two separate two-day “Citizen Juries” in London and Manchester, to involve members of the public in a detailed education and solution-building process – producing “real-world” outcomes with the help of practical advice from technical specialists.

The solutions devised by the Citizen Juries will then be tested by a wider independent public poll and the outcomes of both presented in a report and short film, both of which are expected to be launched in May 2014.

Director of external affairs for SITA UK, Dr Gev Edulgee said: “With government paring back its efforts in this area, it has placed the onus on industry to progress waste and resource policy in England. As a result, we felt it appropriate to work with Keep Britain Tidy in commissioning this detailed and creative study that seeks to find practical, real-world solutions that work for people living and working in urban environments.”

Keep Britain Tidy’s campaigns and communications director Andy Walker said: “Tackling waste is something in which the public has a big role to play but all too often debates about recycling do not include ordinary people. These juries are an opportunity for the man, or woman, on the street to have their say on an important issue that affects us all.”

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