Labour Distances Itself From Food Waste Landfill Ban Promise

Labour has revealed that a promise to deliver a ban on food waste from landfill in England was never adopted as policy, after a Tory dossier claims Labour’s plans involve £21bn in extra spending during the first year of a new parliament alone.

The Tories costed the food waste ban at £477m in the 2015/16 financial year, which has forced Labour to reveal that banning food waste from landfill was never adopted as policy, and is not in the latest national policy forum document.

Labour says the Party’s National Policy Forum (NPF) didn’t agree the ban, despite it being promised in a 2013 speech by the then-shadow environment secretary, Mary Creagh (pictured).

Creagh focused her speech specifically on food, talking to delegates about what she called the “cost of living crisis.”

“Food bills, energy bills, water bills, up. Wages are flat. That’s not right,” she said.

Labour statement – “They say it’s Labour’s policy to ban food waste from landfill, based on an out of date 2013 quote. This is not Labour’s policy – it was not agreed at Labour’s National Policy Forum in July 2014 and is not in the NPF document”

One way to combat the increasing price of food and the increasing number of families relying on food banks is to ban food waste from landfill, Creagh said. 

She went on the say that Labour’s “One Nation” government will “ban food from landfill so that less food gets wasted in the supermarket supply chain and more food gets eaten by hungry children.” (See CIWM Journal Online story)

A statement published by Labour reads: “They say it’s Labour’s policy to ban food waste from landfill, based on an out of date 2013 quote. This is not Labour’s policy – it was not agreed at Labour’s National Policy Forum in July 2014 and is not in the NPF document.”

Labour also went on to refute claims that it would spend £3.7bn to grant borrowing powers to the Green Investment Bank, pointing to George Osborne’s 2011 Budget speech, where he said: “From 2015-16, and subject to our overall debt target being met, we will allow the Green Investment Bank to borrow and invest in a better future.”

According to Green Alliance’s report published last year, “More jobs, less carbon: why we need landfill bans”, landfill bans could help stimulate better collection systems, which could underpin investment in infrastructure and create up to 47,500 jobs in industries such as anaerobic digestion, textile recycling, panelboard, plastics and electronics manufacturing.

The company claims that banning plastics from landfill could create up to 16,100 jobs, 12,100 from banning food waste, 9,500 jobs from a waste electrical and electronic equipment ban, 3,200 from wood and 6,600 from banning textiles. (See CIWM Journal Online story)


 

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