London’s “First” Waste To Heat Network Launched

02-12-13(1)picAn energy from waste heating network, claimed to be the first in London, was officially launched on Friday (29 Nov). The innovative scheme will see waste from Southwark homes transformed into heat and hot water this winter.

Almost 8,000 tonnes of carbon emissions per year will be cut as Southwark Council and its recycling partner Veolia Environmental Services launch London’s first energy from waste district heating network. The reduction is the equivalent of taking 2,700 cars off its roads.

Energy generated from the South East London Combined Heat and Power (SELCHP) facility in Deptford will be used to provide heat to 2,500 homes in Bermondsey, Southwark.

The scheme will run for 20 years, after which the council will decide whether to retain the scheme or revert back to the traditional supply of gas.

Since its inception, the SELCHP facility has only generated electricity, which feeds into the National Grid. This will be the first time that heat will be created as part of the energy process.

The scheme presents a viable alternative to traditional gas fired boilers and will provide sustainable and secure heating for the five estates in Bermondsey.

Councillor Barrie Hargrove – “We’re now able to bring about sustainable pricing and significant environment benefits to local communities. This combined with the increased recycling efforts means that we are sending less to landfill than ever before”

Councillor Barrie Hargrove, Southwark Council cabinet member for transport, environment and recycling, said: “We’re now able to bring about sustainable pricing and significant environment benefits to local communities. This combined with the increased recycling efforts means that we are sending less to landfill than ever before.”

Estelle Brachlianoff, Veolia Environnement executive vice-president, UK and Northern Europe added: “This scheme is a great example to other local authorities of how local waste can be re-used to create energy and heat for local homes.  It’s the circular economy made real and represents an important source of renewable energy that will help keep homes warm this winter and improve energy security and diversity of supply. Combining district heating and energy from waste means residents can secure their heating bills for the next twenty years.”

Minister of State for DECC, Greg Barker, said: “We do not hear enough about heat, it accounts for around half of our total energy consumption and a third of our greenhouse gas emissions.

“Fundamentally, heat is a local issue and finding ways to move to low carbon heating means finding local solutions. That’s where low carbon heat networks play an important role.”

Matthew Pencharz, the Mayor’s senior environment and energy Adviser said: “The Mayor is keen do everything possible to create a more secure, cost-effective and sustainable heat and power supply for London from schemes such as this and from smaller generators. In support of this vision the Mayor is applying for a junior electricity licence to give local generators a better return for their electricity to attract further investment leading to cheaper and lower carbon energy.”

 

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