Man Almost Killed After Sleeping In A Recycling Bin

10-02-14(1)picA man was almost killed after sleeping in a recycling bin in Dublin, spurring Ireland’s largest waste collector to call for safety protocols to be implemented in an effort to avoid fatal incidents.

The incident that spurred the call saw a homeless man who had fallen asleep in a recycling bin narrowly escaped being crushed to death after the bin was tipped into a compactor.

As a result Greyhound Recycling has called for measures to check large containers.

The homeless man is believed to have been sleeping in a large recycling bin in the Hardwick Street flats area of Dublin city centre.

Research by Biffa and CIWM published earlier this months revealed that people sleeping rough do seek shelter in waste and recycling bins, particularly in cold or wet weather, which is putting their lives at risk and has resulted in a number of fatalities.

When CIWM partnered with waste and recycling company Biffa and the rough sleeping service StreetLink to carry out this piece of research, it was in response to a number of industry-wide near misses and fatalities.

Matt Harrison, StreetLink – “People who sleep rough have difficult choices to make, and sheltering in a bin can seem like a safe, dry place to spend the night. However, when the bin is emptied, all too often people are still inside and their lives become immediately at risk”

The report looks at the scale of the problem and sets out industry recommendations for managing this issue.

David Beadle, President of CIWM, said: “Working with homeless charities is vital for developing the right guidance, and to helping those who are unfortunate enough to be sleeping rough to make choices that do not pose an added risk to their wellbeing”.

“People who sleep rough have difficult choices to make, and sheltering in a bin can seem like a safe, dry place to spend the night. However, when the bin is emptied, all too often people are still inside and their lives become immediately at risk,” said Matt Harrison, Director of StreetLink

“It is difficult enough being homeless without being penniless as well. To survive, they have no choice but to beg, borrow, or steal,” Fr McVerry said.

HSE guidance on this issue is available and by ensuring best practice is followed when checking bins prior to tipping, and training waste collection crews to know what advice to give to their customers on the need to lock bins, it is hoped that lives can be saved.

For the report CLICK HERE

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