Man Sentenced To Prison For The Second Time For Waste Offences

05-07-13(3)picAn illegal waste operator has been sentenced to prison for the second time after it was found that he was continuing to run his illegal waste operations.

David Ham, 36, from Gloucestershire, committed the offences at two sites at Whelford in Gloucestershire and Faringdon in Oxfordshire and was sentenced to eight months imprisonment and ordered to pay ordered to pay £9,449 costs.

Ham was previously sentenced to 25 weeks in prison in December 2011 for burning waste and running his illegal waste businesses without an environmental permit from the Old Dairy in Whelford and Faringdon Business Park in Faringdon (pictured).

The Environment Agency’s further investigations revealed that he was continuing his illegal activities at both sites. The waste activities at Whelford site encroached into the Cotswold Park Lake SSSI at Whelford Lakes.

Jack Knight, Environment Agency – “This second custodial sentence, the supervision order and the community service order send out a clear message to criminals that the Environment Agency and the justice system take waste crime seriously”

It was ruled that he had deliberately failed to comply with the previous court orders and had continued to engage in his illegal activities for profit.

The court sentenced him to four months imprisonment for each of the two offences of operating an illegal waste operation at the Old Diary and keeping waste at Faringdon Business Park, to run consecutively.

For the failure to comply with the remediation orders he was sentenced to one month imprisonment for each, to run concurrently and 14 days imprisonment for failing to attend court. A total of eight months imprisonment, suspended for two years, following conditions that he must not commit any further offences in that period and must undertake 200 hours of unpaid community work.

Environment officer Jack Knight said: “This second custodial sentence, the supervision order and the community service order send out a clear message to criminals that the Environment Agency and the justice system take waste crime seriously and that offenders can expect strong sentencing to follow their conviction.”

Ham was also ordered to pay £9,449 costs incurred by the Environment Agency in bringing the prosecution. The court expected £8,500 to be paid within 14 days, from the proceeds of one of his business vehicles that he has recently sold.

 

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