Morrisons To Donate Surplus Food To Reduce Waste

Food-Waste-MorrisonsMorrisons is to roll out an initiative that aims to end the waste of edible food in its 500 supermarkets.

Across the UK, unsold food that is still safe to eat will be made available and donated to local community organisations. They will be able come to the store and collect the food that would previously have been wasted during the week. This includes fresh fruit and vegetables as well as products such as tins and packets.

It follows a trial in over 100 stores in Yorkshire and the North East that will be extended to all stores during the early part of 2016. It involves building a network of community organisations who can make use of the food.

Andrew Clappen, Group Corporate Services Director – “We don’t like the idea of good food going to waste and this programme will ensure that we find a home for the small amount of unsold or used food in our stores.”

The level of edible waste is already minimised through measures such as discounting food before it can no longer be sold or using it in our own staff canteens.

The percentage of edible food in Morrisons stores that is wasted is currently used to produce energy rather than going to landfill. This initiative will ensure it gets eaten.

Andrew Clappen, Group Corporate Services Director, said: “We don’t like the idea of good food going to waste and this programme will ensure that we find a home for the small amount of unsold or used food in our stores.”

Mary McGrath, CEO of FoodCycle, one of the recipient organisations said, “We have 10 hubs close to Morrisons stores and we will be taking food from those stores. This will allow us to feed more people who are at risk of loneliness, isolation and hunger and we would urge other organisations to take part.”

Supermarket Food Waste

The News comes after a British Retail Consortium report revealed the total amount of waste which occurred in supermarkets 2014 was 180,000 tonnes, down from 200,000 tonnes in 2013.

This figure was calculated using data from seven major supermarkets and was independently collated by the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP).

While this decrease in food waste is positive, when looking at the supply chain as a whole, retailers still account for just a little over one percent of the estimated 15m tonnes of food which is wasted in the UK each year, according to the BRC. A considerably higher proportion of this waste occurs at other stages along the supply chain including at the farm and manufacturing stages as well as within the home.

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