New Facility Will Produce Green Energy From Gloucestershire Food Waste

Andigestion's Holsworthy Biogas Plant in West Devon
Andigestion’s Holsworthy Biogas Plant in West Devon

Gloucestershire County Council has signed a new contract with Andigestion Ltd to treat the county’s food waste and turn it into green energy. 

Andigestion is building a new anaerobic digestion waste facility at Wingmoor Farm near Bishop’s Cleeve.

Since 2008 Gloucestershire County Council has been treating food and garden waste and now treats around 22,500 tonnes each year, collected from homes by the county’s district councils.

As well as producing bio fertiliser, which can be used on local farms, the facility, due to open in spring 2015, will turn recycled food waste into green energy.

Cllr Ray Theodoulou – “The facilities at Wingmoor and Rosehill Farm take us a step closer to reaching our aspiration of 70 percent recycling – one of the best recycling rates in Europe”

The new food waste treatment facility is part of a bigger plan to manage Gloucestershire’s waste in a more environmentally friendly and cost effective way including the proposed energy from waste facility at Javelin Park which would stop a further 150,000 tonnes of household waste going to landfill once we’ve reduced, reused and recycled as much as possible.

Because anaerobic digestion is best suited to food waste, a separate new contract has been awarded to MF Bennion Ltd for mixed food and garden waste collected from the Cotswolds and processed at Rosehill Farm, Dymock.

Here bio fertiliser is produced for use on local farmland and is also available to purchase at the Household Recycling Centres.

These two new contracts will continue to prevent food waste ending up in landfill.

Cllr Ray Theodoulou, deputy leader, said: “The facilities at Wingmoor and Rosehill Farm take us a step closer to reaching our aspiration of 70 percent recycling – one of the best recycling rates in Europe. The close working we’ve achieved with the district councils is helping us to realise this.

“Food waste sent to landfill gives off methane, which is 21 times more harmful to the environment than CO2. By ensuring those inevitable scraps and peelings are not sent to landfill we can help protect our environment and save local taxpayers money.”

Those living in Gloucester, Cheltenham, the Forest of Dean and Tewkesbury can now line their food caddies with plastic carrier bags as well as cornstarch bags or paper.


 

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