Plans Submitted For Revolutionary Eco-Friendly Village In Leicestershire

04-06-13(5)picA planning application has been submitted to Melton Borough Council in Leicestershire for a 49-home eco-village, which hopes to be built upon a Greenfield site.

The concept for the pioneering village has been in development for over six years and is based on an idea by local landowner Eric Brown.

Brown has been working in conjunction with HSSP Architects to finalise the plans and ensure that the project can be completed in an environmentally sound manner.

James Brindley – “ Waste water and green waste would feed into the bio-digester, heat and electricity is returned, closing the loop of an almost self-sustaining community”

The village will be self-sufficient in terms of energy supply, with an anaerobic digester providing a constant provision of electricity. The digester will have the capacity to convert up to 10,000 tonnes of sewerage, garden and food waste into fuel that will supply the homes with heat and power, with any excess electricity being fed into the national grid.

The application states that the design of the digester will ensure no unpleasant smells are emitted, and considerable soundproofing will minimise the noise made by internal machinery.

The village will also contain a shop offering local produce, a series of community allotments and charging points for electric cars.

James Brindley, of HSSP Architects, said: “The methane produced [by the digester] will run a 375Kva generator which will in turn feed the housing project. This adds to the green credentials already possible, such as surface and roof water being collected, stored and fed to the site as non-potable water services e.g. toilets, garden and car washing. Waste water and green waste would feed into the bio-digester, heat and electricity is returned, closing the loop of an almost self-sustaining community.

“The design of the homes is in its infancy; however we have some ultra-exciting ideas and hope that this scheme can set a precedent, not only for design but more importantly sustainable living.”

Brindley also highlighted the financial benefits of the houses, saying: “It may cost slightly more than a normal house, but the sustainable measures that are part of that house mean that it will be a lot cheaper to run, and people will see the benefit in the long-term.”

It is expected that the council will consider the application over the summer.

www.hssparchitects.co.uk

 

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