Poll Finds Indecision Over Plastics Recycling Communication

29-10-13(2)picA poll conducted by CIWM Journal Online has found that opinions are divided over plastics recycling, with regards to communication from councils and labels on packaging.

CIWM Journal Online asked its readers to participate in an online poll in response to a survey commissioned by Recoup, which found that poor communication from councils and on packaging is causing confusion about plastics recycling.

The survey asked residents whether certain materials were causing confusion with regards to recycling, and what their current plastics recycling behaviours are.

It revealed that residents were mostly confident about what materials could be recycled and what could not, with just over two percent stating they were not confident.

When asked what materials residents were mostly unsure about, 63 percent of answers were in relation to plastics.

According to the survey, reasons for the lack of certainty came down to poor communication on packaging and from local authorities.

CIWM deputy chief executive, Chris Murphy – “History and experience tells us that a well-informed public will recycle more and waste less. That information should come form manufacturers, retailers and councils in a coordinated fashion. The public want to know what they can recycle, how and why, and what happens to it”

CIWM Journal Online asked visitors whether they agreed with this. The findings revealed a decisive split in the opinion of respondents.

Thirty-six percent said they agreed with the findings of the survey, saying that communication needs to “become much clearer”.

Thirty-one percent believed it is the residents that aren’t getting it, responding: “No, communication is fine. It’s residents that aren’t paying attention”.

And 33 percent believe that more research is needed.

Kent Resource Partnership – which part-funded the survey – chair, Cllr Barrington-King, said of the Recoup report: “Consumer education is a key driver for behavioural change and to increasing plastic recycling rates in Kent and across the country.

“Consumers need ongoing help on which plastics can be recycled as technology progresses, and why there may be economic limitations for some plastics. It’s also important consumers see the evidence of how their actions have positive impacts. The KRP is pleased to support the emerging Plastics Please campaign both strategically and practically.”

CIWM deputy chief executive, Chris Murphy said of the findings: “History and experience tells us that a well-informed public will recycle more and waste less. That information should come form manufacturers, retailers and councils in a coordinated fashion. The public want to know what they can recycle, how and why, and what happens to it.”

For more on CIWM’s thoughts on this read Chris Murphy’s column in the April issue of the CIWM Journal.

 

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