Proposed Recycling Scheme Could Impede King’s Lynn Incinerator

01-08-13(1)picA new recycling scheme set for West Norfolk could divert 30,000 tonnes away from proposed Kings Lynn incinerator, according to Norfolk Councillor.

Councillor for Norfolk County Council, Brian Long, has said that plans to improve West Norfolk’s recycling by introducing a collection that includes yogurt pots and glass could take feed stock away from the proposed incinerator in Kings Lynn.

West Norfolk Council is considering a 10-year contract with Norse Commercial Services to improve recycling in the region, where items such as drinks cartons, yoghurt pots and glass jars or bottles are not recycled as part of the council’s roadside collections.

Brian Long, Norfolk County Council – “The changes we have already made in West Norfolk have reduced that figure by 8,000 tonnes and this new scheme should take away 30,000 tonnes. If you take those figures away from 210,000 tonnes, you start to get very close to the 170,000 tonnes the county is committed to pay for”

The new scheme could divert 30,000 tonnes away from landfill.

Councillor Long, however, is reported to have said that the new scheme will impede feedstock for the incinerator proposed for Kings Lynn.

Contrary to Councillor Long’s view meanwhile, County Hall, is reported to have said that there is enough waste for both the incinerator and recycling targets.

Councillor Long said county figures reported 210,000 tonnes of waste was generated in the county last year.

According to Lynn News, Long said: “The changes we have already made in West Norfolk have reduced that figure by 8,000 tonnes and this new scheme should take away 30,000 tonnes.

“If you take those figures away from 210,000 tonnes, you start to get very close to the 170,000 tonnes the county is committed to pay for.

“West Norfolk is pursuing different recycling technology for its residual waste, which should remove another 25,000 tonnes.

“You haven’t got enough to feed the machine that under contract you have to pay for.”

The county’s cabinet member for environment, transport, development and waste, David Harrison, said: “This new agreement for Norfolk’s main recycling centre at Costessey, near Norwich, provides an excellent opportunity – and more capacity in our growing county – to boost recycling rates.”

“That also means less waste to landfill, which will help our environment and lower landfill costs for council taxpayers which currently amount to around £20m a year.

“Sadly there is more than enough domestic and commercial waste in Norfolk to also warrant a waste treatment facility for the waste left over which will save taxpayers in Norfolk millions compared with the cost of using landfill.”

The Council has been considering whether to ditch plans for the incinerator and is reviewing the cost of pulling out of the contract.

Abandoning the incinerator could see termination fees of up to £90m having to be paid to contractor Cory Wheelabrator, a council report said.

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