Salford Considers Three-Weekly Waste Collection Trials

three-weekly-waste-collections-SalfordPlans for a three-weekly bin collection pilot in parts of Salford will be decided on next week when proposals go to cabinet. 

The proposals would see pasts of the area – Worsley, Boothstown, Ellenbrook, Irlam, Cadishead, Little Hulton, Swinton North, Swinton South, Pendlebury, Walkden North, and Walkden South – have their residual waste collected every three weeks instead of two.

Town hall chiefs are planning to trial having collections for non-recyclable waste every three weeks, instead of fortnightly, in the west of the city.

The pilot would run between July 2016 and February 2017.

Councillor Gena Merrett, executive lead member for housing and environment, said: “Salford’s waste disposal costs will increase significantly over the next three years if the city can’t increase recycling and reduce the costs of waste sent to landfill. This is at a time when it is important to reduce spending with pressures on council budgets to make £38 million of savings over the next two years.

Councillor Gena Merrett – “Salford’s waste disposal costs will increase significantly over the next three years if the city can’t increase recycling and reduce the costs of waste sent to landfill”

“Disposing of waste into landfill is expensive and harms the environment.

“Other neighbouring authorities have higher rates of recycling and our data shows that over a third of the contents of general waste bins could be recycled, so there is potential for increasing recycling with the support of residents.

“We have investigated a number of options for Cabinet to consider next week and the recommendation is to introduce a pilot to test three weekly collections for residual non-recyclable waste in nine wards. This is yet to be agreed, but if it is decided to make the change it will be introduced carefully following the pilot. We will be consulting in full on progress of this.”

Food waste will remain a weekly collection and recyclables a fortnightly collection.

In a statement the council said it needed to do this because of the rising costs of waste disposal in landfill and the cost of disposing of residual waste is rising to £325 per tonne.

“By reducing the capacity of the black bin we hope to increase recycling and reduce landfill or residual waste and save at least £1m per year, money that we will be able to spend on much needed services for people, such as children and young people, the elderly and health care rather than putting it in a hole in the ground.”

Send this to a friend