Scottish Waste Regulations Still Need To Reach Those Unaware

23-05-14(2)picIn a statement six months after the implementation of the Scottish Waste Regulations, which came into effect at the beginning of the year, Zero Waste Scotland has said the challenge is to now reach those how are still unaware of them. 

In a survey earlier this year, Zero Waste Scotland found that eight out of ten companies were compliant with the new regulations.

Iain Gulland, director, Zero Waste Scotland said that this points to that fact that the regulations are working – but that the challenge is to now reach those who are still unaware of them.

“Earlier this year we announced that eight-out-of-ten businesses surveyed were aware of the new Waste (Scotland) Regulations, with nine-out-of-ten ‘confident’ that they were compliant.

“That’s a great indication that the message is out there and the regulations are working,” he said.

“By using a contractor which has signed up to the commitment, businesses can be assured that they will be provided with a high quality recycling service which is compliant with the new regulations”

“There is of course still a challenge to reach businesses that aren’t yet aware of the regulations. We can help companies to become compliant through our free Resource Efficient Scotland advice service. Companies can also check if their waste contractor has signed up Scotland’s Resource Sector Commitment – a voluntary scheme.

“By using a contractor which has signed up to the commitment, businesses can be assured that they will be provided with a high quality recycling service which is compliant with the new regulations.”

The new regulations are aimed at bolstering the Scottish Government’s ambitious target of 70 percent recycling and just five percent of waste going to landfill by 2025.

Businesses in Scotland are required to separate plastic, glass, metal, paper and card for recycling. Most food businesses are now also required to separate food waste.

Those who fail to adhere to the new regs risk a fine of up to £10,000.

 

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