Voting Ashtrays Go Global To Reduce Cigarette Litter

Behaviour change charity Hubbub’s voting ashtray bins are going global, with Sutton being the first council to install the bins and with pre-orders coming in from councils in France, US, Japan, Indonesia and Switzerland have now pre-ordered the bins.

The success of the bins (nearly 30% less cigarette litter), which were first trialled in Villier Street, London, has spiked the interest of councils and businesses from all over the world.

Sutton will be the first council to install the bins. To mark the occasion, two actors dressed up as Superman and Batman in Sutton High Street so smokers can vote who their favourite super hero is: Superman or Batman, to tie in with the premiere of Superman vs Batman.

Trewin Restorick, CEO/Founder of Hubbub – “The voting bin is a simple solution that has provoked an incredibly positive response. We’ve had requests from around the world for the bin with many countries wondering how they can change the questions to reflect their country’s culture and interests”

Littering cost the tax-payer as much as £850 million in clean up costs each year. A report from the Communities and Local Government (CLG) Committee found that chewing gum and cigarettes were found to be the most littered items, while fast-food litter increased by 20% in the last year.

The idea of the Ballot Bins is based on the best methods and research findings on how to stop cigarette littering. Hubbub found that litter was mainly generated at night by young men and that cigarette butts are the biggest litter issue in the UK. 35,2% of smokers litter, followed by 26% of people eating chewing gum.

The voting bin was a response to these research findings and the sport focused questions reflect the interests of the audience they are trying to reach.

Trewin Restorick, CEO/Founder of Hubbub comments: “The voting bin is a simple solution that has provoked an incredibly positive response. We’ve had requests from around the world for the bin with many countries wondering how they can change the questions to reflect their country’s culture and interests.

“So we have taken the plunge and are now scaling up production so that we can sell the bins to tackle the issue of litter in a fun and engaging way.”

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