Waste Crime “Feels To Me Like Drugs Felt In The 1980s” – EA Chief

ea-waste-crime-legal-472x298Waste crime is the “new narcotics”, according to the head of the environment agency (EA).

In an interview with the Guardian, chief executive of the EA, Sir James Bevan, likened waste crime to the UK’s war on drugs in the 80s, saying waste crime can have a serious impact on communities.

He said: “Waste is the new narcotics. It feels to me like drugs felt in the 1980s: the system hadn’t quite woken up to the enormity of what was going on and was racing to catch up.”

“Waste is the new narcotics. It feels to me like drugs felt in the 1980s: the system hadn’t quite woken up to the enormity of what was going on and was racing to catch up.”

Waste crime costs England £1bn a year and more than 1,000 illegal waste sites were discovered last year, more than in the previous two years combined, with 662 still active as of the end of march, the guardian reports.

Bevan also said it was important to work with waste companies that wanted to improve their operations: “Waste companies get a bad rap, but we should recognise that most waste companies are responsible, law-abiding, conscientious and good for our communities.

“They take our waste away and turn it into something better and if we didn’t have them, we’d be in a bad place.”

Despite the increase in waste crime activity, he went on to say: “England is getting a better place to live – greener, cleaner and more prosperous. There is more to do, absolutely, but the glass is half full.”

For the Guardian article CLICK HERE


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