Work “Jointly & Collaboratively”, Says DCLG’s Planning Policy For Waste

The national waste planning policy consultation report has been published, accompanied by the new “National Planning Policy for Waste”, which suggests councils should work “jointly and collaboratively” with other planning authorities to collect and share data and information on waste. 

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) launched its consultation on an updated national waste planning policy in July this year. The Department said the new policy document means councils can no longer give special consideration to locational needs, or wider economic benefits the site could bring, over other considerations, as justification for building waste facilities on green belt land.

Policy has been reinforced with regards to planning for waste facilities such as recycling facilities, making it clear that companies and councils should first look for suitable sites and areas on brownfield land, according to the report.

The document also says that green belts offer a “strong defence” against urban sprawl, and new measures will ensure this continues.

“In preparing local plans, waste planning authorities, including by working collaboratively with other planning authorities, should first look for suitable sites and areas outside the green belt for waste management facilities that, if located in the green belt, would be inappropriate development”

It said the new policy “brings waste into line with the policies on other development, where approval should only be given in very special circumstances, and brownfield sites should be sought in the first instance”.

It says: “In preparing local plans, waste planning authorities, including by working collaboratively with other planning authorities, should first look for suitable sites and areas outside the green belt for waste management facilities that, if located in the green belt, would be inappropriate development.

“Local planning authorities should recognise the particular locational needs of some types of waste management facilities when preparing their local plan”.

Waste planning authorities should “ensure that the planned provision of new capacity and its spatial distribution is based on robust analysis of best available data and information, and an appraisal of options. Spurious precision should be avoided”.

The consultation report replaces “Planning Policy Statement 10: Planning for Sustainable Waste Management” (PPS 10) and is to be considered alongside other national planning policy for England — such as in the National Planning Policy Framework (2012), Defra’s Waste Management Plan for England (2013) and the National Policy Statements for Waste Water and Hazardous Waste (2012 and 2013 respectively).

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